“I Came Over The Bridge With Them”, Taxi Cab Driver Admits Involvement In 9/11 Black Op? ** HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

Woah.

Filed under: Africa, Agriculture, Asia, Bolivia, China, Corporations, Crime, Culture, East Asia, Economics, Europe, Film, Financial, Health, History, Humanity, Immigration, Israel, Journalism, Law, Media, Middle East, Military, North America, Palestine, Politics, Psychology, Russia, Science, South America, Technology, UK, World Affairs, , ,

Nosferatu, F.W. Murnau, 1922

Nosferatu (1922) Originally released in 1922 as Nosferatu, Eine Symphonie Des Grauens, director F.W. Munarau’s chilling and eerie adaption of Stoker’s Dracula is a silent masterpiece of terror which to this day is the most striking and frightening portrayal of the legend. Director: F.W. Murnau

Filed under: Film, ,

Esoteric Agenda, The Movie

Filed under: Culture, Film, Humanity,

The Living Dead, Adam Curtis: How The Second World War Was Re-Written

“On the Desperate Edge of Now- This episode examined how the various national memories of the Second World War were effectively rewritten and manipulated in the Cold War period. For Germany, this began at the Nuremberg Trials, where attempts were made to prevent the Nazis in the dock—principally Hermann Göring—from offering any rational argument for what they had done. Subsequently, however, bringing lower-ranking Nazis to justice was effectively forgotten about in the interests of maintaining West Germany as an ally in the Cold War. For the Allied countries, faced with a new enemy in the Soviet Union, there was a need to portray WW2 as a crusade of pure good against pure evil, even if this meant denying the memories of the Allied soldiers who had actually done the fighting, and knew it to have been far more complex. A number of American veterans told how years later they found themselves plagued with the previously-suppressed memories of the brutal things they had seen and done. The title comes from a veteran’s description of what the uncertainty of survival while combat is like.”

“You Have Used Me as a Fish Long Enough- In this episode, the history of brainwashing and mind control was examined. The angle pursued by Curtis was the way in which psychiatry pursued tabula rasa theories of the mind, initially in order to set people free from traumatic memories and then later as a potential instrument of social control. The work of Ewen Cameron was surveyed, with particular reference to Cold War theories of communist brainwashing and the search for hypnoprogammed assassins. The programme’s thesis was that the search for control over the past via medical intervention had had to be abandoned and that in modern times control over the past is more effectively exercised by the manipulation of history. Some film from this episode, an interview with one of Cameron’s victims, was later re-used by Curtis in his The Century of the Self. The title of this episode comes from a paranoid schizophrenic seen in archive film in the programme, who believed her neighbours were using her as a source of amusement by denying her any privacy, like a pet goldfish.”

The Attic- In this episode, the Imperial aspirations of Margaret Thatcher were examined. The way in which Mrs Thatcher used public relations in an attempt to emulate Winston Churchill in harking back to Britain’s “glorious past” to fulfil a political or national end. The title is a reference to the attic flat at the top of 10 Downing Street, which was created during Thatcher’s period refurbishment of the house, which did away with the Prime Minister’s previous living quarters on lower floors. Scenes from The Innocents (film) the adaptation of The Turn of the Screw by Henry James are intercut with Thatcher’s reign

More superb journalism from Adam Curtis.

Filed under: Europe, Film, History, Journalism, Media, Military, North America, Palestine, Politics, Russia, UK, World Affairs, , , ,

Before Music Dies, “The Most Important Film A Music Fan Will Ever See”

Narrated by Academy Award® Winner Forest Whitaker, BEFORE THE MUSIC DIES is an unsettling and inspiring look at today’s popular music industry featuring interviews and performances by Erykah Badu, Eric Clapton, Dave Matthews, Branford Marsalis, ?uestlove and a wide variety of others. The documentary film has built a passionate following as “the most important film a music fan will ever see” (XM Radio) by providing “a balanced overview of the state of the rock scene of America” (The Wall Street Journal) and adding “passion to the eternal debate about the industry” (The New York Times). Last year, BEFORE THE MUSIC DIES filmmakers Andrew Shapter and Joel Rasmussen walked away from traditional Hollywood distribution to instead pursue a large-scale grassroots release with B-Side Entertainment. Since its release in November 2006, the film has screened over 200 times in over 130 North American markets with hundreds of additional events anticipated worldwide during 2007. Use this site to learn more about the film, where you can see it, ways you can own it, and – most importantly – how you can get involved in sharing it with others.

“The music industry has abandoned musicians and fans.”

Filed under: Culture, Film, Music, , ,

John Carpenter: Fear Is Just The Beginning (The Man And His Movies)

Filmmaker John Carpenter helped redefine the American horror film in 1978 with Halloween, a low-budget thriller which became a major box office success. Since then, Carpenter has devoted his career to bringing a fresh perspective to genre filmmaking, striving to maintain the freedom of an independent while working within the studio system. (Carpenter not only writes and directs his own projects, but often also serves as producer and composer as well.) John Carpenter: Fear Is Just the Beginning…The Man and His Movies is a documentary about this two-fisted maverick auteur, which offers a look at the making of such favorites as Escape From New York, The Thing, The Fog, and many more. The documentary includes interviews with Jamie Lee Curtis, Kurt Russell, Adrienne Barbeau, Debra Hill, and other friends and colleagues.

Filed under: Culture, Entertainment, Film, Music, North America, ,

Iran (Is Not The Problem), Vancouver International Antiwar Film Festival

http://www.iranisnottheproblem.org

IRAN (is not the problem) is a feature length film responding to the failure of the American mass media to provide the public with relevant and accurate information about the standoff between the US and Iran, as happened before with the lead up to the invasion of Iraq.

Filed under: Film, Humanity, Israel, Journalism, Media, Middle East, Military, North America, Politics, World Affairs,

Chariots Of The Gods, Classic 1970 Documentary Based On Von Daniken’s Book Of The Same Name ** HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

A whirlwind world tour of some of the craziest unanswerable questions archaeology and history has to offer us. And, yeah, as pointed out below, the music is great.

Filed under: Culture, Film, History, Humanity, Literature, Paranormal, Philosophy, Science, Technology, ,

Welcome To North Korea, Winner Of 2001 International Emmy For Best Documentary ** HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

“Type: Documentary Rating: NR Running Time: 60 Minutes Starring: Directed by: Peter Tetteroo, Raymond Feddema PLOT DESCRIPTION The winner of the 2001 International Emmy award for Best Documentary, Welcome to North Korea is a grotesquely surreal look at the all-too-real conditions in modern-day North Korea. Dutch filmmaker Peter Tetteroo and his associate Raymond Feddema spent a week in and around the North Korean capital of Pyongyang — ample time to produce this outstanding film. Creative Commons license: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs; from http://www.archive.org. “

Filed under: East Asia, Film, History, Humanity, Journalism, Military, World Affairs,

Grass (1925), Bakhtiari Tribe Annual Migration Seeking Fresh Grazing For Livestock

“1925! . That is right! 1925 documentary about the bakhtiari tribe regular annular migration (Yeylaagh & Gheshlaagh) accross Zardkoh to reach fresh grass for their animals. This is an awsome documentary showing their challanges as they tried to pass Karun and all other difficulties of the routine chores “

If this video isn’t working, try the google page here.

Filed under: Agriculture, Film, Middle East, Nature

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About me

I'm a Media and Communications graduate from Goldsmiths College, London, a Project Manager and Web Developer (C#, PHP). In my spare time I like to write fiction, music, and read current affairs.

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